FENS facilitates the dissemination of scientific information through a series of online resources, available to all.

Browse the directory below and access a vast array of online materials, including position papers, training and career development materials, outreach and advocacy resources.

Title Description Type Year
Treasures from Cajal and De Castro

Compilation of the classic histological techniques used by Cajal and his disciples to found modern Neurology and Neuroscience.

Website 2012 Open URL
Unboxing the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis – Corpus Curiosum (Series III)

Talk by Yoko Wang, The University of Adelaide

Since we were born, we have shared our life with millions of tiny little buddies in our gut. These tiny little buddies, or the gut microbiota, play important roles in regulating the gut-brain axis. In recent years, research in this field has rapidly grown, increasing our understanding on how gut microbiota communicate to the brain and influence our health. In this talk, we will unbox the amazing world of the microbiota-gut-brain axis – learning about their history, the current progress and future directions.

The Corpus Curiosum series was produced with the support of FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training (CHET)

Video 2021 Unboxing the Microbiota-Gut-Brain Axis – Corpus Curiosum (Series III)
Unknown Ivan Pavlov

Translation and digitalization of the archival unpublished materials about Ivan Pavlov.

Website 2014 Open URL
Unmasking plant intelligence through education – Corpus Curiosum (Series III)

Talk by Dr Paco Calvo, University of Murcia

Bored of classroom-based education? Tired of getting lost and spacing out? Fed-up being stuffed with somebody else’s knowledge; the type of “knowledge” that you are simply expected to parrot the day of the exam, then wait for your grades which mean…. nothing really? Welcome to the Hippocampus-Fattening Farm, the educational system you have been raised in since Primary school, all the way into college, and beyond! My aim in this talk is to promote forms of learning based on trying o “know less” and think outside the box more. I shall illustrate how this can help propel creativity in the discussion of plant intelligence in the (neuro)cognitive sciences, robotics and AI.

The Corpus Curiosum series was produced with the support of FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training (CHET)

Video 2021 Unmasking plant intelligence through education – Corpus Curiosum (Series III)
Unraveling the Past of Women in Neurosciences
Unraveling the Past of Women in Neurosciences: their Contributions to Understanding of Brain and Behaviour – a History Online Project awardee.
Video Unraveling the Past of Women in Neurosciences
Untold Stories: the Women Pioneers of Neuroscience in Europe

These are the stories of seven women born before 1900, who worked hard to pursue a career in science and who published pioneering works, largely forgotten.

Website 2016 Open URL
Using ORCID at FENS.org

Get the best information on how you can use ORCID to get visibility for your published work and receive practical advice, ideas and the best tips directly from FENS and ORCID. Do you want to learn how to connect your ORCID iD with FENS.org and ensure you get recognition for all your contributions? This flash-FENS online session provides you with the necessary information about ORCID, followed by a demo on how to use your ORCID ID and a 15-minutes Q&A session.

Video 2022 Using ORCID at FENS.org
Using Twitter to communicate in your science life

How can scientists best use Twitter to communicate science? Learn from scientists who use Twitter on a regular basis as a tool for science communication.
Organised by the FENS Communication Committee at the FENS 2020 Virtual Forum. Download your Twitter guide in the resource section of the FENS website.

Video 2020 Using Twitter to communicate in your science life
Volodymyr Betz (1834-1894) – World-renowned neurobiologist

Website dedicated to the world-ren0wned Ukrainian neurobiologist Volodymyr Betz (1834-1894).

Website 2015 Open URL
Volodymyr Pravdych-Neminsky (1879-1952): first EEG and struggle for neuroscience research

Biography of Volodymyr Pravdych-Neminsky: life and and contribution to electroencephalography.

Website 2015 Open URL
Webinar: Running a Brain Awareness Week event in 2022

This webinar aimed to provide participants with useful tips on how to write a successful Brain Awareness Week (BAW) application and how to run an engaging outreach event. The webinar will include a case study of a funded BAW project and an interactive Q&A session with the panellists to provide hands-on tips to the audience.

Video 2021 Webinar: Running a Brain Awareness Week event in 2022
What can we learn from tiny brains? Big lessons from organoid culture – Corpus Curiosum (Series IV)

Talk by Folu Oyefeso, Loma Linda University

The human brain is a complex network of cells with special functions to control how we interact with the world. Within the brain, these cells are grouped into areas responsible for thinking, moving, sensing, among many other things! However, it is notoriously difficult to study the human brain directly and so scientists use animal and two-dimensional cell culture models to learn more about it. Recently, trained teams of cell biologists and neuroscientists have begun to generate three-dimensional brain organoids, which are small clumps of tissue containing the same types of cells we see in the brain. These tissues can model specific brain regions (e.g. cortex) and diseases (e.g. Zika virus infection or Parkinson’s disease). In this session, we’ll discuss how these models have been used and how they could be used in the future.

The Corpus Curiosum series was produced with the support of FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training (CHET)

Video 2022 What can we learn from tiny brains? Big lessons from organoid culture – Corpus Curiosum (Series IV)
What is FENS?

FENS is the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies. Find out more about our activities and how we can support you.

Video 2020 What is FENS?
What makes a Scientist? – Corpus Curiosum (Series II)
Science is a part of our culture, and yet in many ways it stands apart. Scientists make knowledge and strive for that knowledge to be more trustworthy, more credible and, as a consequence, more important than other knowledge. What about science and scientists enables them to do this and why is scientific knowledge dismissed from cultural, political and social debates nonetheless? In this talk, Dr Bart Penders will visit the origins of scientific credibility and its social history, and will trace it into its present form of discussions about rigour and research integrity.
Video 2020 What makes a Scientist? – Corpus Curiosum (Series II)
Why Do We Need Philosophy in Neuroscience? – Corpus Curiosum (Series I)

Despite a long historical relationship between science and philosophy, scientists today tend to see philosophy as very different from, and indeed even antagonistic to, the scientific endecour.

Video 2020 Why Do We Need Philosophy in Neuroscience? – Corpus Curiosum (Series I)
Why fake news is so fascinating to the brain

Social media have profoundly changed the ways information is communicated and news can be manipulated by groups, aimed at spreading their opinions rather than scientifically verified data. As a consequence, communication has become more difficult for researchers who had to modify they way they communicate in order to meet the public attention.

During this event, panellists discussed and tried to understand the context in which fake-news develop, the basis for behaviours associated with fake-news and the brain areas and neurotransmitters associated with those behaviours.

This special interest event was organised by the FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training at the FENS Forum 2022 (9-13 July 2022, Paris).

Video 2022 Why fake news is so fascinating to the brain
Why is fake news so fascinating to the brain?

Present-day fake news generates an “information disorder” in which news satire, parody, fabrication, manipulation, advertising, and propaganda are blended and denoted using a threefold distinction: (1) misinformation, that is, unintentional incorrect information; (2) disinformation, that is, the deliberate fabrication and/or sharing of false information; (3) mal-information, that is, deliberate publication of true private/sensitive information with change of context (cherry picking).

This EJN Editorial was published following the Special Interest Event organised at FENS Forum 2022 by the FENS Committee for Higher Education and Training (CHET).

 

Website 2022 Open URL
Why it’s important to be open about animal research in Portugal – video of EARA event in Lisbon

This event, focused on Improving Openness in Animal Research in Portugal, highlighted the importance of the Portuguese Transparency Agreement and the need to be proactive in giving the public information on the use of animals in research. The event was part of a series supported by FENS and SfN.

Video 2020 Open URL
Why Study the History of Neuroscience?

Paper published by Richard Brown.

Document View/Download
Why your MSc or PhD programme should join NENS?

The Network of European Neuroscience Schools (NENS) represents over 200 graduate neuroscience schools and programmes across 28 European countries that offer MSc, PhD and MD-PhD degrees in neuroscience.

Document 2022 View/Download
Women Neuroscientists in the Cajal School

Paper on the women neuroscientists in the Cajal School.

Document View/Download
Women Pioneers of Neuroscience in Europe

Promo of: Untold stories: the Women Pioneers of Neuroscience in Europe, the film and the website.

Video Women Pioneers of Neuroscience in Europe
Women Pioneers on the train

These are women who worked in Europe during the first half of twentieth century and made relevant contributions to the many fields of modern neuroscience. The initial phase of this project was awarded in 2016 by the FENS History Committee

Video Women Pioneers on the train
Women Scientists and their Contributions to the Development of Hippocampus-Memory field in the European and World Neuroscience

Project funded under the FENS call for history of neuroscience projects.

Video 2018 Women Scientists and their Contributions to the Development of Hippocampus-Memory field in the European and World Neuroscience
Writing a constructive peer review: a young PI perspective (FKNE opinion article published in EJN)

Opinion article produced by FENS-Kavli Scholars (FKNE), and published in the European Journal of Neuroscience (EJN).

Website 2016 Open URL
You are not alone: selecting your group members and leading an outstanding research team (FKNE opinion article published in EJN)

Opinion article produced by FENS-Kavli Scholars (FKNE), and published in the European Journal of Neuroscience (EJN).

Website 2015 Open URL
Young, John Z. – UK

Biography of Young, John Z. – UK
Via SfN

Document View/Download
Your ticket to independence: a guide to getting your first Principal Investigator position (FKNE opinion article published in EJN)

Opinion article produced by FENS-Kavli Scholars (FKNE), and published in the European Journal of Neuroscience (EJN).

Website 2015 Open URL